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judgment and decision-making

How to Become a Better Lie Detector: Focus on Feelings

Woman and man with back to one another; woman looking over her shoulder
Do you want to be better at detecting lies? The key is to ask yourself what emotions the other person is feeling.

Emotional People Make More Extreme Judgments

Angry Older woman with smoke coming out of her ears
How strongly you feel your emotions is related to how strongly you judge other people’s bad actions – and lots of other things.

Perceived Scientific Consensus as a Gateway to Bridging the Climate Change Divide

Helicopter view of North Miami Beach condominiums along the ocean

In the United States, climate change is a highly polarizing topic. How can we reduce this political polarization? In our research on attitudes about climate change, we seem to have discovered an answer. When people are reminded that almost all climate scientists believe in climate change, they become much less skeptical about it. 

How to Give Away Your Cake and Eat It Too

Person taking slice of fresh delicious colorful cake at table, top view
Allowing others to distribute resources can increase your chances of getting what you want.

Psychology News Roundup: ICYMI February 22, 2019

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From romance to buying choices to God, there's a bit of something for everyone in this week's roundup. Recently in the news, written a post, or have selections you'd like us to consider? Email us, use the hashtag #SPSPblog, or tweet us directly @spspnews. 

Smartphone Use Undermines Enjoyment of Face-to-Face Interactions at Dinnertime

Atlanta, GA - While “Take your elbows off the dinner table,” is a common refrain for many families, people may soon add, “take your phone off the table” to the list, too.  According to research being presented at the Society for Personality and Social Psychology Annual Convention, people with smartphones present during dinner time report less enjoyment than those who kept their phones away.

There’s been the assumption that engaging in phone use during social interactions would dampen happiness, but this is the first field experiment to gather empirical data to prove the point.

Metaphors Bias Perceptions of Scientific Discovery

While the metaphor that ideas appear “like light bulbs” is popular and appealing, new research shows that discovery metaphors influence our understanding of the scientific process and perceptions of the ability of inventors based on their gender.

Freaks, Geeks, Norms and Mores: Why People Use the Status Quo as a Moral Compass

By Christina Tworek

The Binewskis are no ordinary family. Arty has flippers instead of limbs; Iphy and Elly are Siamese twins; Chick has telekinetic powers. These traveling circus performers see their differences as talents, but others consider them freaks with “no values or morals.” However, appearances can be misleading: The true villain of the Binewski tale is arguably Miss Lick, a physically “normal” woman with nefarious intentions.

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