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Psychology News Roundup: ICYMI January 11, 2019

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Welcome 2019. We're back with our weekly roundup of news, blogs, and tweets. Recently in the news, written a post, or have selections you'd like us to consider? Email us, use the hashtag #SPSPblog, or tweet us directly @spspnews. 

Psychology News Roundup: ICYMI December 7, 2018

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Catch up on this week's posts on hate, personality, and why cookie monster is the best muppet.

Recently in the news, written a post, or have selections you'd like us to consider? Email us, use the hashtag #SPSPblog, or tweet us directly @spspnews.

On the Blogs

Hate: Dropping the H-Bomb via Character & Context

Psychology News Round-Up: ICYMI September 21, 2018

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This week: deep dives on micro-cheating, personality types and the 'real you.' See what else you may have missed online.

Recently in the news, written a post, or have selections you'd like us to consider? Email us, use the hashtag #SPSPblog, or tweet us directly @spspnews.

Psychology News Round-Up: ICYMI July 20, 2018

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This week round-up covers the gamut — from sex to cynicism to the World Cup. See what you may have missed online.
Recently in the news, written a post, or have selections you'd like us to consider? Email us, use the hashtag #SPSPblog, or tweet us directly @spspnews.
 

The Psychology of Social Class

Image of suburban houses clustered very close together

By the turn of the millennium, before the banking crash of 2008 and the subsequent years of economic austerity imposed on citizens by many western governments, there was a view – even among politicians in left-leaning political parties – that class-based politics was no longer relevant. In the words of the UK’s Deputy Prime Minister, John Prescott, “We are all middle class now.” These words were uttered in 1997, probably encouraged by a rising tide of prosperity that appeared to be benefitting most, if not all, members of society. Twenty-one years later, the world looks very different.

Want Narcissists to Donate to Your Cause? Make it About Them

BUFFALO, N.Y. — When narcissistic individuals are able to imagine themselves in a victim’s situation, they are more likely to donate to charity, according to new research from the University at Buffalo School of Management.

The study, forthcoming in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, found that appeals explicitly asking donors to put themselves in the recipient’s circumstance were more effective at provoking concern and donations from narcissists than appeals that only described the recipient’s plight.

Psychology News Round-Up: ICYMI May 25, 2018

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This week's roundup features the latest on motivation, bias, daydreaming, and personality Recently in the news, written a post, or have selections you'd like us to consider? Email us, use the hashtag #SPSPblog, or tweet us directly @spspnews.
 

On the Blogs

Do Infectious Diseases Dampen Innovation?

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By Annie Drinkard

Just as the body has a biological immune system to help protect itself from illness and disease, psychologists have identified a “behavioral immune system” [i] that plays a complementary role. The term refers to the psychological predispositions, like our aversion to noxious smells and tastes that ensure that we minimize our exposure to things in our environment that could make us sick.

Personality and Place: New Insights on Person-Environment Links

Psychological traits, such as personality and well-being, are spatially and regionally clustered within cities, states, countries, and the world. Four presentations showcase cutting-edge research that investigates how traits are spatially and geographically clustered, what mechanisms drive the uneven distribution of traits, and the consequences of these spatial patterns. The presentations are part of a symposium featured at the SPSP 16th Annual Convention in Long Beach, California.

Life satisfaction and location

Psychology of Food Choice: Challenging the Status Quo

Researchers are challenging conventional beliefs about the effectiveness of traditional strategies for encouraging healthy eating. The symposium, "Challenging Misconceptions About the Psychology of Food Choice," includes four presentations that tackle issues such as the harmfulness of weight-stigma, encouraging healthy choices, and strategies to help children and teens. The symposium is featured at the SPSP 16th Annual Convention in Long Beach, California.

Helping kids eat more vegetables

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